Aug 19, 2019  
2018-2019 Undergraduate Academic Catalog | Expires Aug. 2025 
    
2018-2019 Undergraduate Academic Catalog | Expires Aug. 2025 THIS CATALOG IS ARCHIVED. BE SURE YOU ARE ACCESSING THE MOST ACCURATE CATALOG FOR YOU.

Courses


 

English

  
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    ENGL 395 - Independent Laboratory/Studio


    An independent research project in the discipline by a student; a cooperative research project with a faculty member or an advanced independent studio in a performing art. The student and instructor must agree on a project before enrollment.

    Requisites: Instructor permission, 3.00 GPA or higher, and a minimum of 12 credits in the discipline. (Required, Previous).

    Credits:1-4 cr

1-4 cr
  
  •  

    ENGL 410 - Topics/Medieval & Renaissance Literature


    A study of a theme or subject as it relates to the development of literature in English during the Middle Ages or the Renaissance. The title of the Course Schedule will reflect the specific subject matter of the course.

    Requisites: ENGL 201, ENGL 301 (Required, Previous).

    Credits:3 cr

3 cr
  
  •  

    ENGL 415 - Seminar in Selected Author Prior to 1800


    An intensive study of the works of a single canonical figure prior to 1800. Subjects might include a major figure such as Chaucer, Spenser, Shakespeare, Milton or another writer of equal significance.

    Requisites: ENGL 201, ENGL 301 (Required, Previous).

    Credits:3 cr

3 cr
  
  •  

    ENGL 417 - Seminar in Selected Author Post 1800


    An intensive study of the works of a single canonical figure after 1800. Subjects might include William Wordsworth, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Charles Dickens, Mark Twain, Jane Austen, Virginia Woolf, William Faulkner, or another writer of equal significance.

    Requisites: ENGL 201 (Required, Previous).

    Credits:3 cr

3 cr
  
  •  

    ENGL 426 - Topics in 17th & 18th Century Literature


    A study of a theme or subject as it relates to literature in English written during the 1600s or 1700s. The title in the Course Schedule will reflect the specific subject matter of the course.

    Requisites: ENGL 201, ENGL 301. (Required, Previous).

    Credits:3 cr

3 cr
  
  •  

    ENGL 431 - Topics- 19th Cent Lit of the Brit Empire


    A study of a theme or subject as it relates to the literature of the British Isles and/or British Empire written between 1800 and 1900. The title in the Course Schedule will reflect the specific subject matter of the course.

    Requisites: ENGL 201, ENGL 301. (Required, Previous).

    Credits:3 cr

3 cr
  
  •  

    ENGL 434 - Topics in 20th Cen Brit & Post-Col Lit


    A study of a theme or subject as it relates to the literature of the British Isles, the Commonwealth, the former British colonies outside of North America, or a combination of these traditions since 1900. The title in the course schedule will reflect the specific subject matter of the course.

    Requisites: ENGL 201, ENGL 301. (Required, Previous).

    Credits:3 cr

3 cr
  
  •  

    ENGL 441 - Topics in 19th Century American Lit


    Variable specialized studies in some cross-cultural aspect, theme, or period in American literature during the 1800s. May focus on literature in the U.S. or may take a multi-national approach to literatures of the Americas. The title in the Course Schedule will reflect the specific subject matter of the course.

    Requisites: ENGL 201, ENGL 301. (Required, Previous).

    Credits:3 cr

3 cr
  
  •  

    ENGL 442 - Topics in American Lit 1900-present


    Variable specialized studies in some cross-cultural aspect, theme, or period in American literature from 1900 to the present. May focus on literature in the U.S. or may take a multi-national approach to literatures of the Americas. The title in the Course Schedule will reflect the specific subject matter of the course.

    Requisites: ENGL 201, ENGL 301. (Required, Previous).

    Credits:3 cr

3 cr
  
  •  

    ENGL 461 - Seminar in Creative Writing


    A seminar on various topics in creative writing. Particular emphasis determined by instructor. May be repeated once for credit with instructor permission.

    Requisites: Restricted to English-Creative Writing majors only, or instructor permission. Minimum of 6 previous hours of creative writing courses. (Required, Previous).

    Credits:3 cr

3 cr
  
  •  

    ENGL 465 - TESOL II: Adv Meth, Materials, & Assess


    Lesson planning, strategies, resources identification and development, and assessment at all levels of TESOL. environment in which they plan to be certified. Includes classroom observation and practical experience.

    Requisites: ENGL 365. (Required, Previous).

    Credits:3 cr

    Notes: Must be taken prior to enrolling in a TESOL practicum.
3 cr
  
  •  

    ENGL 470 - Second Lang and Culture Acquisition


    Second language acquisition theories and research; the nature and role of culture in language development and academic achievement; comparisons between American English and mainstream culture, and other languages and cultures.

    Requisites: ENGL 244, ENGL 350, ENGL 355, or ENGL 370. (Required, Previous).

    Credits:3 cr

3 cr
  
  •  

    ENGL 482 - Methods of Teaching English


    An examination of the components that make up the English curriculum and their integration in secondary English classrooms. These include expository and creative writing, the reading and appreciation of literature, language study, classroom drama, and non-print media.

    Requisites: ENGL 380, TEMS 302 and RPW 300 or ENGL 301 (Required, Previous).

    Credits:3 cr

3 cr
  
  •  

    ENGL 490 - Special Topics


    A departmental course in a subject are not currently listed in the catalog. A descriptive title will appear on the Course Schedule and transcript.

    Credits:1-4 cr

1-4 cr
  
  •  

    ENGL 491 - Seminar in Sel Author, Period Or Topic


    Seminar in selected author, period or topic (1-4).

    Credits:1-4 cr

1-4 cr
  
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    ENGL 493 - Directed Study


    Intensive study of an author, literary form or period.

    Requisites: Instructor permission, a plan of study for approval before enrolling. (Required, Previous).

    Credits:1-4 cr

1-4 cr
  
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    ENGL 494 - Independent Research


    An independent research project in the discipline by a student or a cooperative research project with a faculty member. The student and instructor must agree on a project before enrollment.

    Requisites: Instructor permission, 3.00 GPA or higher, and a minimum of 12 credits in the discipline. (Required, Previous).

    Credits:1-4 cr

1-4 cr
  
  •  

    ENGL 495 - Independent Lab/Studio


    An independent research project in the discipline by a student; a cooperative research project with a faculty member or an advanced independent studio in a performing art. The student and instructor must agree on a project before enrollment.

    Requisites: Instructor permission. (Required, Previous).

    Credits:1-4 cr

1-4 cr
  
  •  

    ENGL 496 - Practicum in TESOL


    Supervised work in a setting appropriate to each student’s current or future TESOL environment. Students will prepare a teacher portfolio relevant to their programs.

    Requisites: Program advisor permission, ENGL 244, ENGL 365 ENGL 465, ENGL 470 or graduate equivalents. Required for all students completing the ESL endorsement or TESOL certificate programs. (Required, Previous).

    Credits:3 cr

3 cr
  
  •  

    ENGL 497 - Senior Project


    An independent Senior project in the discipline.

    Requisites: Senior standing in the discipline, instructor permission. (Required, Previous).

    Credits:3 cr

3 cr
  
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    ENGL 498 - Honors Thesis


    Preparation and completion of an Honors Thesis. May enroll twice, once for the preparation of the proposal and once for its completion.

    Requisites: Honors students status and thesis advisor permission. (Required, Previous).

    Credits:3 cr

3 cr
  
  •  

    ENGL 499 - Senior Seminar in Literary Studies


    Capstone for English majors; specific authors, themes, or disciplinary issues will vary. Students will integrate knowledge and skills from the program in this focused study of literary texts. Students will produce a well developed academic paper and publicly present their findings.

    Requisites: 21 credits towards and English major including ENGL 301. (Required, Previous).

    Credits:3 cr

3 cr

Finance

  
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    FIN 104 - Consumer Finance


    The course will give students a general exposure to the economic and social developments that continue to influence the personal financial planning environment. Topics include financial institutions, financial markets and government financial systems.

    Credits:3 cr

3 cr
  
  •  

    FIN 302 - Investment Analysis


    Basic concepts relating to security analysis, available investments and portfolio management. Risk and selection are explored in conjunction with market analysis and investment timing.

    Requisites: ECON 222, junior standing. (Required, Previous).

    Credits:3 cr

3 cr
  
  •  

    FIN 304 - Financial Management


    Basic theoretical framework for decision making in financial management within a corporate, social and political environment. Role of the financial manager in balancing risk and profitability. Financial planning to estimate sources and uses of funds. Fundamentals of capital budgeting and international finance. Case studies are used.

    Requisites: ACCT 213 and junior standing. (Required, Previous).

    Credits:4 cr

4 cr
  
  •  

    FIN 305 - Principles of Risk and Insurance


    A study of risk and risk meeting methods with emphasis on insurance as a mechanism. Legal relationships, types of carriers, principle types of coverage and problems of risk managers.

    Requisites: Junior standing. (Required, Previous).

    Credits:3 cr

3 cr
  
  •  

    FIN 306 - Commercial Banking


    Problems of commercial banking discussed from the point of view of bank management; asset management, liability management, credit analysis, capital accounts, investment policies, as well as current topics including bank marketing, branch banking, bank holding companies, etc.

    Requisites: ECON 222, junior standing. (Required, Previous).

    Credits:3 cr

3 cr
  
  •  

    FIN 307 - Real Estate Finance


    An analysis of the various types of real estate investments, the institutions involved in real estate finance and financial options utilized. Emphasis will be on current trade and techniques.

    Requisites: ECON 222, junior standing. (Required, Previous).

    Credits:3 cr

3 cr
  
  •  

    FIN 308 - Student Managed Investment Portfolio


    An opportunity for College of Business and Managements students to gain hands-on experience in fiduciary management of investment assets through security research, asset valuation, asset allocation, and portfolio management. Students will manage an allocation of the Saginaw Valley State University Foundation’s endowment. This course may be taken multiple times but only 2 credit hours will be counted for the major.

    Requisites: FIN 302 or instructor permission. (Required, Previous).

    Credits:2 cr

2 cr
  
  •  

    FIN 310 - International Finance


    A study of contemporary problems in international finance. An analysis of the international money and capital markets, working capital considerations, currency problems, capital budgeting problems as faced by multinational firms and international investments.

    Requisites: Junior standing. (Required, Previous).

    Credits:3 cr

3 cr
  
  •  

    FIN 311 - Entrepreneurial Finance


    Topics covered will include business life cycle financing, forecasting, cash flow burn, securities laws, financial planning, types and costs of financial capital, venture capital, alternative financing, financial distress, exit strategies. Applied methodologies will be used to teach this course.

    Requisites: Junior standing. (Required, Previous).

    Credits:3 cr

3 cr
  
  •  

    FIN 313 - Money and Financial Institutions


    An exploratory course into the role of money, banking, and financial institutions. Topics such as monetary policy, banks and other financial intermediaries, and significant developments in monetary/banking policy are covered. Students are provided with the tools necessary to evaluate monetary policy and the role of banks in the financial markets from both the theoretical and practical aspects.

    Requisites: ECON 222  , junior standing. (Required, Previous).

    XLIST: ECON 313 

    Credits:4 cr

4 cr
  
  •  

    FIN 342 - Global Experience in Finance


    The course provides students with an academic and experiential learning opportunity abroad. The primary goal of this course is to learn how to do business in an international setting.

    Requisites: Junior status, Instructor Permission

    XLIST: ACCT 342 , LAW 342  

    Credits:3 cr

    Notes: Special course fees may apply.
3 cr
  
  •  

    FIN 390 - Special Topics


    A departmental course in a subject area not currently listed in the catalog. A descriptive title will appear in the Course Schedule and the transcript.

    Requisites: As listed in course schedule. (Required, Previous).

    Credits:1-4 cr

1-4 cr
  
  •  

    FIN 401 - Investment Strategy


    A study of the role of stocks and bonds in a dynamic economy with analysis of various theories and techniques available to achieve superior selection in management of securities.

    Requisites: FIN 302, FIN 304, ECON 222 and junior standing or instructor permission. (Required, Previous).

    Credits:3 cr

3 cr
  
  •  

    FIN 403 - Advanced Financial Management


    Case studies in financial management with emphasis placed on current problems and the strategies used by financial managers to solve them.

    Requisites: FIN 304, junior standing. (Required, Previous).

    Credits:3 cr

3 cr
  
  •  

    FIN 405 - Financial Policy


    This course is designed to serve as the capstone course in finance. Course topics include dividend policy, valuation of the firm, capital budgeting decisions and other topics of current interest in the financial sector.

    Requisites: FIN 304, LAW 308 and junior standing or instructor permission. (Required, Previous).

    Credits:4 cr

4 cr
  
  •  

    FIN 490 - Selected Topics in Finance


    A departmental course in a subject area not currently listed in the catalog. A descriptive title will appear on the Course Schedule and the transcript.

    Requisites: As listed in the course schedule (Required, Previous).

    Credits:1-4 cr

1-4 cr
  
  •  

    FIN 493 - Directed Readings in Finance


    A student must submit a plan of study for approval by the faculty member and the dean before enrolling.

    Requisites: FIN 302, instructor permission. (Required, Previous).

    Credits:1-4 cr

1-4 cr
  
  •  

    FIN 493A - Directed Readings in Finance


    Requisites: Instructor permission. (Required, Previous).

    Credits:1-3 cr

1-3 cr
  
  •  

    FIN 493B - Directed Readings in Finance


    Requisites: Instructor permission. (Required, Previous).

    Credits:1-3 cr

1-3 cr

French

  
  •  

    FREN 111 - Elementary French I (GE9)


    Introduction to the study of French language and culture, including the skills of reading, writing, listening and speaking. Emphasis on oral communication skills. Includes student work in language laboratory and computer laboratory.

    Credits:4 cr

    General Education:  

4 cr
  
  •  

    FREN 112 - Elementary French II (GE9)


    Continuation of the study of French language and culture, including the skills of reading, writing, listening and speaking. Emphasis on oral communication skills. Includes student work in language laboratory and computer laboratory.

    Requisites: FREN 111 or equivalent. (Required, Previous).

    Credits:4 cr

    General Education:  

4 cr
  
  •  

    FREN 190 - Special Topics


    A departmental course in a subject area not currently listed in the catalog. A descriptive title will appear on the Course Schedule and the transcript.

    Requisites: As listed in the course schedule. (Required, Previous).

    Credits:1-4 cr

1-4 cr
  
  •  

    FREN 211 - Intermediate French I (GE9)


    Study of French language and culture, including review of the basic elements of the language and further acquisition of communication skills in reading, writing, listening and speaking. Emphasis on French as an international language system and cultural system. Includes student work in language laboratory and computer laboratory.

    Requisites: FREN 112, or the equivalent. (Required, Previous).

    Credits:4 cr

    General Education:  

4 cr
  
  •  

    FREN 212 - Intermediate French II


    Comprehensive review of French language and culture, and intensive work in written and oral communication. Emphasis on French as an international language system and cultural system. Includes student work in language laboratory and computer laboratory.

    Requisites: FREN 211 or the equivalent. (Required, Previous).

    Credits:4 cr

4 cr
  
  •  

    FREN 290 - Special Topics


    A departmental course in a subject area not currently listed in the catalog. A descriptive title will appear on the Course Schedule and the transcript.

    Requisites: As listed in the course schedule. (Required, Previous).

    Credits:1-4 cr

1-4 cr
  
  •  

    FREN 312 - Intro to French Literature


    Students read and discuss selected representative works from the Renaissance through the 20th century; also discussed are major literary/artistic movements of these periods. Course work includes readings, papers, exams, presentations.

    Requisites: FREN 212 or instructor permission. (Required, Previous).

    Credits:3 cr

3 cr
  
  •  

    FREN 321 - French Composition


    Stresses the acquisition of grammar skills through original composition.

    Requisites: FREN 212 or instructor permission. (Required, Previous).

    Credits:3 cr

3 cr
  
  •  

    FREN 332 - French Conversation


    Oral proficiency is acquired through both guided and free discussion.

    Requisites: FREN 212 or instructor permission. (Required, Previous).

    Credits:3 cr

3 cr
  
  •  

    FREN 334 - French Phonetics


    Theoretical and practical study of French pronunciation and intonation using the International Phonetic Alphabet.

    Requisites: FREN 212 or instructor permission. (Required, Previous).

    Credits:3 cr

3 cr
  
  •  

    FREN 340 - French Civilization


    Survey course of French culture from the Middle Ages to the present time, including reading, discussion, and research on such cultural elements as the arts, social institutions, politics, and historical events.

    Requisites: FREN 212 or instructor permission. (Required, Previous).

    Credits:4 cr

4 cr
  
  •  

    FREN 390 - Special Topics


    A departmental course in a subject area not currently listed in the catalog. A descriptive title will appear on the Course Schedule and the transcript.

    Credits:1-4 cr

1-4 cr
  
  •  

    FREN 391 - Special Seminar


    A departmental seminar in a subject area not currently listed in the catalog. A descriptive title will appear on the Course Schedule and the transcript.

    Requisites: As listed in the course schedule. (Required, Previous).

    Credits:1-4 cr

1-4 cr
  
  •  

    FREN 420 - Literature of the 17th & 18th Centuries


    The primary focus of the course is reading and discussing selected literary writings of the neo-classical period (17th century) and the Enlightenment (18th century). In addition to intensive reading and discussions, course work, includes written papers, presentations, and exams.

    Requisites: One 300-level FREN course or instructor permission. (Required, Previous).

    Credits:3 cr

3 cr
  
  •  

    FREN 425 - Literature of the 19th Century


    Novel, poetry and drama from Romanticism to Naturalism.

    Requisites: One 300-level FREN course or instructor permission. (Required, Previous).

    Credits:3 cr

3 cr
  
  •  

    FREN 430 - Literature of the 20th & 21st Centuries


    Novel, poetry and drama from Naturalism to present.

    Requisites: One 300-Level FREN course or instructor permission. (Required, Previous).

    Credits:3 cr

3 cr
  
  •  

    FREN 435 - Literature of the Francophone World


    A survey of contemporary works from outside of metropolitan France, including those by African, West Indian, and French Canadian authors.

    Requisites: One 300-Level FREN course or instructor permission. (Required, Previous).

    Credits:3 cr

3 cr
  
  •  

    FREN 441 - Contemporary France


    Intensive study of the daily life in France; the geography; central regional and local governments; political parties; schools and universities; religions, social programs; employment, family life, marriage, current events and French participation in the European union.

    Requisites: One 300-level FREN course or instructor permission. (Required, Previous).

    Credits:4 cr

4 cr
  
  •  

    FREN 451 - Advanced Composition & Conversation


    An in-depth study of French grammar, stylistics, and pronunciation through reading, lectures, guided and free discussion. Composition as a process will be addressed.

    Requisites: FREN 321 or FREN 332 or instructor permission. (Required, Previous).

    Credits:4 cr

4 cr
  
  •  

    FREN 455 - Intensive Language Review


    This course is a comprehensive review of the major elements of written and oral French. This will include extensive practice of the more difficult grammatical structures as well as the addition of idiomatic expressions. Course work includes written and oral review exercises, compositions, presentations, and discussions.

    Requisites: FREN 321, FREN 332 or FREN 451 or instructor permission. (Required, Previous).

    Credits:4 cr

4 cr
  
  •  

    FREN 457 - French/English Translation


    Translation from English to French and French to English with emphasis on accuracy and good style in each language. Correct usage is also stressed. Students move beyond word for word translation to idiomatic usage.

    Requisites: FREN 321, FREN 451 or FREN 455, or instructor permission. (Required, Previous).

    Credits:4 cr

4 cr
  
  •  

    FREN 490 - Special Topics


    A departmental course in a subject area not currently listed in the catalog. A escriptive title will appear on the Course Schedule and transcript.

    Requisites: FREN 321 or instructor permission (Required, Previous).

    Credits:1-4 cr

1-4 cr
  
  •  

    FREN 491 - Seminar in French Studies


    A departmental seminar in a subject area not currently listed in the catalog. A descriptive title will appear on the Course Schedule and transcript.

    Requisites: Instructor permission. (Required, Previous).

    Credits:3 cr

3 cr
  
  •  

    FREN 498 - Honors Thesis


    Preparation and completion of an Honors Thesis. May enroll twice, once for the preparation of the proposal and once for its completion.

    Requisites: Honors student status and thesis advisor permission. (Required, Previous).

    Credits:3 cr

3 cr
  
  •  

    FREN 499 - Directed Study


    With the guidance and approval of a member of the French faculty, students may investigate an area, of French studies – including literature, culture, and/or language – that is not included in the content of an existing course.

    Requisites: Instructor permission. (Required, Previous).

    Credits:1-4 cr

1-4 cr

Gender Studies

  
  •  

    GS 100 - Introduction to Gender Studies (GE10)


    Core course for gender studies minor. An analysis of the significance of gender in our culture, from the perspectives of communication, English, history, philosophy, political science, psychology, sociology.

    Requisites: ENGL 111. (Required, Previous).

    Credits:3 cr

    General Education: Category 10 

3 cr
  
  •  

    GS 494 - Capstone Project in Gender Studies


    Research culminating in a final paper focused on one issue within the scope of Gender Studies, to be undertaken as an independent study, with the approval and under the supervision of any faculty member regularly offering courses within the Gender Studies Program. The focus of these projects will vary considerably from student to student, depending upon disciplinary orientation.

    Credits:3 cr

3 cr
  
  •  

    GS 498 - Honors Thesis


    Preparation and completion of an honors thesis. May enroll twice, once for the preparation of the proposal and once for its completion.

    Requisites: Honors students status and thesis advisor permission. (Required, Previous).

    Credits:3 cr

3 cr

Geography

  
  •  

    GEOG 101! - Introduction to Physical Geography (GE4)


    An introduction to Earth’s varied climates, environments and landforms. Lectures are accompanied by in-class activities designed to develop specific skills, including navigation and interpretation of topographic maps, climate and weather maps, air photos and satellite images. Communication skills are developed with oral reports, essays and a term paper.

    Requisites: ENGL 111 or equivalent. (Required, Previous).

    Credits:3 cr

    General Education:     

3 cr
  
  •  

    GEOG 190 - Special Topics in Geography


    A departmental course in a subject area not currently listed in the catalog. A descriptive title will appear on the course schedule and the transcript.

    Requisites: As listed in the course schedule. (Required, Previous).

    Credits:1-4 cr

1-4 cr
  
  •  

    GEOG 201 - World Cultural/Regional Geography (GE8)


    Surveys the world using concepts from the disciplinary subfields of physical, historical, cultural, political, and economic geography and demography. Emphasis on similarities and differences among world regions, and on developing abilities to evaluate international media coverage.

    Credits:3 cr

    General Education:  

3 cr
  
  •  

    GEOG 202! - North Amer Regional Geography (GE6)


    Geographic regions of North America. Special emphasis on role of geographic issues in past and present relations between U.S. and Canada and Mexico.

    Requisites: ENGL 111. (Required, Previous).

    Credits:3 cr

    General Education:     

3 cr
  
  •  

    GEOG 210 - Introduction to Soil Science


    Introduction to Soil Science provides an introduction to the nature and properties of soils from an agricultural and natural resource perspective. Topics include physical, biological, and chemical properties and processes; soil genesis; soil water and nutrient cycles; soil classification, distribution, and mapping; and soil management and environmental issues. Some laboratory and field assignments will require scheduling time outside of regularly scheduled lecture periods.

    Credits:3 cr

3 cr
  
  •  

    GEOG 290 - Selected Topics in Geography


    A sophomore-junior level seminar in selected areas of geographical study.

    Credits:1-3 cr

1-3 cr
  
  •  

    GEOG 301 - Environmental Issues in Geography


    An examination of contemporary environmental issues addressing human impacts on air, water, land, soil, vegetation, animal species, and natural resources. Topics to include: global climate change, energy types and use, water resources, air pollution, land cover change, hazardous waste, agriculture and food production, human population, and sustainability.

    Requisites: Any geography course or any course from General Education Category 4 (Natural Science) (Required, Previous).

    Credits:3 cr

3 cr
  
  •  

    GEOG 302 - Climatology and Climate Change


    This course introduces students to the forces that control Earth’s climate, how Earth’s climate has changed naturally over time, and how scientists measure and reconstruct climate changes. This course also covers current anthropogenic (human-caused) climate change, including the evidence for it, how it differs from what has happened in the past, and its impact on human and natural systems.

    Requisites: GEOG 101!  (recommended)

    Credits:3 cr

3 cr
  
  •  

    GEOG 309 - Natural Hazards and Geomorphology


    In the globalized world in which we live, every natural hazard contains two separate components: the natural science cause for the hazard, and the linked human-environmental effect of the hazard. In this course, students will understand the cause for natural hazards, and assess the risk associated with various types of natural hazards based on the proximity to a region’s “hot spots”. Students will gain an appreciation for how the natural sciences are used to address real-world problems by:

    1. Analyzing any given natural disaster from a scientific, historical, and social perspective using theories and models that help describe the natural world.
    2. Organizing and displaying collected data, interpret experimental observations and construct explanatory scientific hypotheses.
    3. Articulating key considerations in planning and decision making related to managing the impacts of natural disasters.

    Secondary goals include the introduction of geospatial tools and preparation for students to take additional courses in Physical Geography.

    Requisites: GEOG 101!   or PHYS 106A  

    Credits:3 cr

3 cr
  
  •  

    GEOG 311 - Geography of Africa


    Examines Africa’s great achievements, serious problems, and enormous potential. Topics include prehistory, historical geography, environments, population, food production systems, health and disease, tropical deforestation and desertification, political geography, and economic development strategies.

    XLIST: HIST 380  

    Credits:3 cr

3 cr
  
  •  

    GEOG 312 - Historical Geography of Latin America


    This course examines Latin America from both spatial and historical perspectives, while focusing on economic, political, demographic, and cultural linkages through time and space. Topics include, pre-Columbian settlement, colonization, the slave trade, economic development, political (r)evolutions, human impact on the landscape, population growth, migration, and urbanization.

    XLIST: HIST 381 

    Credits:3 cr

3 cr
  
  •  

    GEOG 320 - Principles of Urban Geography


    This course examines the origin, diffusion, and growth of urban areas, as well as the relationship between urban areas and the environment. The internal structure, economic role, and function of cities, as well as issues of social justice and segregation of certain people, are also discussed.

    Credits:3 cr

3 cr
  
  •  

    GEOG 322 - Geography of Population


    An examination of spatial patterns of fertility, mortality, and mobility among the world’s regions. Special emphasis is placed on the settlement patterns of U.S. immigrants, internal migration patterns within U.S., and the spatial variation in demographic and economic characteristics of the U.S. population.

    Requisites: GEOG 101! and GEOG 201 or GEOG 202! (Required, Previous).

    Credits:3 cr

3 cr
  
  •  

    GEOG 325 - Crime Mapping & Analysis


    This interdisciplinary course introduces students to Geographic Information Systems (GIS) applied to Criminal Justice theory and practices. Emphasis is placed on mapping crime data to determine spatial patterns, trends and hot spots through the scope of criminal justice theory for the end goal of informing police decisions. Students will develop skills in using ArcGIS extensions, managing spatial data, understanding statistical results, and applying existing criminal justice best practices to solve spatio-temporal problems.

    XLIST: CJ 325  

    Credits:3 cr

3 cr
  
  •  

    GEOG 330 - Cultural Geography


    Introduces students to foundational concepts and theories used in the spatial patterns of the cultural landscape. Topics include Roots and Meanings of Culture, Ethnic Geography, Gender, Geography, Folk and Popular Culture, Patterns of Development, Urban Systems, and Language and Religion.

    Credits:3 cr

3 cr
  
  •  

    GEOG 340 - Geographic Information Systems


    An introduction to the use of spatial data processors called geographic information systems (GIS). This course covers the utilization and interpretation of geo-referenced spatial data using current GIS software. Lectures and laboratory exercises introduce students to: data models and structures; cartographic representation; and processes for measuring, mapping and analyzing spatial data.

    Requisites: 1 Geog course (Required, Previous).

    Credits:3 cr

3 cr
  
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    GEOG 341 - Remote Sensing


    A technical course designed to develop the basic remote sensing skills expected of entry-level employees in planning, mapping and natural resource agencies. Lectures explain the essentials of satellite image and air photo interpretation, which students apply to problems in urban and agricultural land use, natural resource management, terrain evaluation, and archaeology. Thermal infrared, radar, and weather satellite images also are examined.

    Requisites: 1 GEOG course (Recommended, Previous).

    Credits:3 cr

3 cr
  
  •  

    GEOG 350 - Economic Geography


    Introduces students to concepts and theories used in understanding spatial patterns of economic development and interaction. Topics include: urban hierarchy, patterns of economic interaction, global economic trade and development. International economic organizations (World Bank, WTO) and the results of their projects, transportation geography as it relates to economic development and growth, economic effects on the environment, and trends in the agriculture industry and the global politics of food.

    Requisites: GEOG 201, GEOG 202! (Required, Previous). | ECON 221 (Recommended, Previous).

    Credits:3 cr

3 cr
  
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    GEOG 385 - Special Regional Studies in Geography


    A junior-senior level course in selected areas of geographic study.

    Requisites: GEOG 101!, GEOG 201 or GEOG 202! (Required, Previous).

    Credits:3 cr

3 cr
  
  •  

    GEOG 390 - Special Topics in Geography


    A departmental course in a subject area not currently listed in the catalog. A descriptive title will appear on the Course Schedule and the transcript.

    Requisites: GEOG 101! (Required, Previous).

    Credits:1-6 cr

1-6 cr
  
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    GEOG 431 - Geography of Fresh Water Resources


    Examines the physical geography of freshwater (the hydrologic cycle), spatial patterns and uneven distribution of fresh water resources, and issues of poor water quality and people’s lives. Includes the prehistory and history of human-water interactions from early settlement patterns, through the manipulations of fresh water to service humankind, to current and expected freshwater crises. also explored are aquatic ecosystems and their impact by human activities, political and economic aspects of diminishing water supplies, privatization of municipal water systems, irrigation of cropland in arid and semi-arid climates, over-pumping of aquifers, and water diversions from sources like the Great Lakes.

    Requisites: GEOG 101!. (Required, Previous).

    Credits:3 cr

3 cr
  
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    GEOG 440 - Advanced Geographic Information Systems


    This course is designed to familiarize undergraduate students in geography with advanced concepts, principles, techniques, and the practice of using Geographic Information Systems. The course is both theoretical and practical, addressing the structure of Geographic Information Systems and their use for spatial analysis and data management.

    Requisites: GEOG 340. (Required, Previous).

    Credits:3 cr

3 cr
  
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    GEOG 441 - Advanced Remote Sensing


    This course builds upon the basic remote sensing skills developed in Remote Sensing (GEOG 341), particularly as they apply to digital imagery. It uses a problem-based approach that allows the student to gain experience with advanced image processing and analysis techniques. Problems for projects come from both the social and physical sciences. The course also provides experience conducting independent research on remote sensing-related topics. Combined with Advanced Geographic Information Systems (GEOG 440), this course represents the pinnacle of a student’s geotechniques education at SVSU.

    Requisites: GEOG 341. (Required, Previous).

    Credits:3 cr

3 cr
  
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    GEOG 450 - Research Methods


    This course explores quantitative, qualitative, and field techniques used by geographers to analyze geographical phenomena. Includes project design, data collection, elements of field work, and basic statistical procedures and interpretation.

    Requisites: 9 credits in GEOG. (Required, Previous).

    Credits:3 cr

3 cr
  
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    GEOG 460 - Geographic Inquiry


    This course introduces students to the development of geography as a discipline from ancient times to the present, with an emphasis on the 19th through 21st centuries. Students will conduct original research in a geographic subfield appropriate to their minor track.

    Requisites: Two from: GEOG 101!, GEOG 201, GEOG 202! and two 300/400 level GEOG courses or instructor permission. (Required, Previous).

    Credits:3 cr

3 cr
  
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    GEOG 494 - Independent Study/Internship


    GEOG 494 is the course number used for independent, study (for courses/projects that do not already have a designated course number) and for internships. Students must work under the supervision of a full-time faculty member in the Geography Department and submit a proposed program of study which will be approved by the Geography Department Chair prior to the semester in which the student wishes to engage in an independent study or internship.

    Requisites: GEOG 101!, GEOG 201, GEOG 202!, instructor permission. (Required, Previous).

    Credits:1-6 cr

1-6 cr
  
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    GEOG 498 - Honors Thesis


    Preparation and completion of an Honors Thesis. May enroll twice, once for the preparation of the proposal and once for its completion.

    Requisites: Honors students status and thesis advisor permission. (Required, Previous).

    Credits:3 cr

3 cr
  
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    GEOG 499 - Directed Internship or Research Project


    In this course, students will apply the skills they have acquired in their geography courses to actual issues outside of the classroom in an experiential learning environment. Often, this work will take the form of a directed internship with a company or other community partner organization. It may also take the form of a faculty-directed research project, often in conjunction with community partners. While most of the work will be done outside of the classroom, all enrolled students will meet with the professor five times over the course of the semester in order to share experiences about their internships or projects, troubleshoot and solve problems collectively, discuss ethics and philosophies, and prepare their presentations and final reports. Students will leave this course with a thorough understanding of how to apply their geographic skills in a professional setting, and be able to demonstrate that they can do so to potential employers. Students must have an instructor-approved internship or project in order to enroll in this class.

    Requisites: Nine (9) credits of 300-400 level GEOG courses

    Credits:3 cr

    Notes: Before enrolling, student must have an instructor-approved internship already lined up.
3 cr

German

  
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    GER 111 - Elementary German I (GE9)


    Introduction to the study of German language and culture including the skills of reading, writing, listening and speaking. Emphasis on oral communication skills. Includes student work in language laboratory and computer laboratory.

    Credits:4 cr

    General Education: Category 9 

4 cr
  
  •  

    GER 112 - Elementary German II (GE9)


    Continuation of the study of German language and culture including the skills of reading, writing, listening and speaking. Emphasis on oral communication skills. Includes student work in language laboratory and computer laboratory.

    Requisites: GER 111 or equivalent. (Required, Previous).

    Credits:4 cr

    General Education: Category 9 

4 cr
  
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    GER 211 - Intermediate German I (GE9)


    Study of German language and culture, including review of the basic elements of the language and further acquisition of communication skills in reading, writing, listening and speaking. Emphasis on German as an international language system and cultural system. Includes student work in language laboratory and computer laboratory.

    Requisites: GER 112 or equivalent. (Required, Previous).

    Credits:4 cr

    General Education:  

4 cr
 

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