Jun 17, 2019  
2018-2019 Undergraduate Academic Catalog | Expires Aug. 2025 
    
2018-2019 Undergraduate Academic Catalog | Expires Aug. 2025 THIS CATALOG IS ARCHIVED. BE SURE YOU ARE ACCESSING THE MOST ACCURATE CATALOG FOR YOU.

Courses


 

Computer Science

  
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    CS 446 - Operating Systems


    This course presents an introduction to the design and implementation of both traditional and distributed operating systems. Topics include processes, memory management, file systems, I/O, deadlocks, distributed systems, synchronization, distributed file systems, and case studies.

    Requisites: CS 331 (Required, Previous).

    Credits:4 cr

4 cr
  
  •  

    CS 451 - Programming Language Concepts


    An examination of the principles behind the design of programming languages (iterative, functional, logic, structured and object-oriented): syntactical design, semantics, control structures, data types and structures, memory usage and other implementation issues. Topics such as lexical analysis & parsing, interpretive languages, binding times and run time considerations will also be presented.

    Requisites: CS 316 (Required, Previous).

    Credits:4 cr

4 cr
  
  •  

    CS 461 - Theory of Computation


    This course provides an introduction to basic models of computational complexity and the representation of infinite objects. Topics that will be examined including grammars, finite state machines, automata theory, Turing machines, computability and decidability, regular and context free languages.

    Requisites: CS 316 (Required, Previous).

    Credits:4 cr

4 cr
  
  •  

    CS 471 - Senior Computer Science Capstone


    This course provides a continuation of the senior CS projects initiated in CS 421. Students will be required to implement and deliver a large scale system in a group-based project environment.

    Requisites: CS 421 (Required, Previous).

    Credits:4 cr

4 cr
  
  •  

    CS 476 - Computer Graphics


    This course presents the basic concepts of computer graphics generation, software and hardware requirements for graphics, and its applications. Topics include the X window system, graphics computation over networks, functions of the client and server, graphics input and output devices, interactive program development, graphical and text attributes, construction of panels and buttons, algorithmic techniques for window clipping & viewport transformation, 2-D object transformation, 3-D object modeling and animation, and graphics applications.

    Requisites: CS 316 (Required, Previous).

    Credits:4 cr

4 cr
  
  •  

    CS 482 - Artificial Intelligence & Expert Systems


    This course presents a study of artificial intelligence and expert systems. Topics include PROLOG programming, search methods, knowledge acquisition, knowledge representation including belief networks, knowledge validation, neural networks, expert system development including uncertainty management methods such as statistical, symbolic, and fuzzy logic, expert system shell, survey of current expert systems, and future trends.

    Requisites: CS 216 (Required, Previous).

    Credits:4 cr

4 cr
  
  •  

    CS 490 - Topics in Computer Science


    A departmental course in a subject area not currently listed in the catalog. A descriptive title will appear on the Course Schedule and the transcript.

    Requisites: CS 421 (Required, Previous).

    Credits:4 cr

4 cr
  
  •  

    CS 491 - Special Seminar


    A departmental seminar in a subject area not currently listed in the catalog. A descriptive title will appear on the course schedule and the transcript.

    Requisites: As listed in the course schedule (Required, Previous).

    Credits:1-4 cr

1-4 cr
  
  •  

    CS 492 - Honors


    A course approved by the Honors Committee in a subject area not currently listed in the catalog. A descriptive title will appear on the Course Schedule and the transcript.

    Requisites: Honors student status, instructor permission. (Required, Previous).

    Credits:1-4 cr

1-4 cr
  
  •  

    CS 496 - Field Studies


    Applications of the discipline in off-campus locations. The student and instructor must agree on the project before enrollment.

    Requisites: Instructor permission, 2.50 GPA or higher, and a minimum of 12 credits in the discipline (Required, Previous).

    Credits:1-4 cr

    Notes: May enroll only twice in one department.
1-4 cr
  
  •  

    CS 497 - Special Topics


    An independent senior project in the discipline.

    Requisites: Senior major in the discipline, instructor permission (Required, Previous).

    Credits:1-4 cr

1-4 cr
  
  •  

    CS 498 - Honors Thesis


    Preparation and completion of an Honors Thesis. May enroll twice, once for the preparation of the proposal and once for its completion.

    Requisites: Honors student status, thesis advisor permission. (Required, Previous).

    Credits:3 cr

3 cr

Criminal Justice

  
  •  

    CJ 201! - Intro to Criminal Justice (GE7)


    A survey of the philosophical and historical origins of criminal justice. Development of the American criminal justice system.

    Requisites: ENGL 111 (Required, Previous).

    Credits:3 cr

    General Education:  ,   

3 cr
  
  •  

    CJ 206 - International Law


    This course provides a survey of the general parameters of international law as well as some of the current issues such as piracy, war crimes, genocides, human rights, and environmental law. The class utilizes a variety of means to gain a better understanding of international law, including a moot court or mock trial exercise and case briefing of major international legal cases.

    Requisites: PS 130!  or PS 205  (Required, Previous).

    XLIST: PS 306  

    Credits:3 cr

3 cr
  
  •  

    CJ 290 - Special Topics in Cj


    A departmental course in a subject area not currently listed in the catalog. A descriptive title will appear on the Course Schedule and the transcript.

    Credits:1-4 cr

1-4 cr
  
  •  

    CJ 302 - Policing


    The historical and social settings of the police; the police role and discretion; police organization and practices; problems of law enforcement in contemporary society.

    Credits:3 cr

3 cr
  
  •  

    CJ 303 - Criminal Courts


    The organization and operation of local, state, and federal courts in America; emphasis on the steps in the legal process and the roles of principal legal actors-prosecutors, defense counsel, and judges.

    Credits:3 cr

3 cr
  
  •  

    CJ 304 - Corrections


    The historical and social settings of corrections; theories and practices in corrections; correctional programs in institutions and the community.

    Credits:3 cr

3 cr
  
  •  

    CJ 305 - Criminal Law


    The study of the authority of government to regulate conduct within constitutional limitations. Primary emphasis will be on learning the principles (i.e., elements) of traditional crimes, finite legal distinctions among various offenses, and applicable defenses.

    Credits:3 cr

3 cr
  
  •  

    CJ 315 - Private Security


    The role of security and the security industry; relationships of private security with public law enforcement; administrative, personnel and physical aspects of the security industry; loss prevention management in proprietary and governmental institutions.

    Credits:3 cr

3 cr
  
  •  

    CJ 316 - Criminal Investigation


    The study of crime investigation as a process; the investigation of serious crimes, focusing on crimes against persons and property; the contribution of specialized methods and scientific processes in investigation.

    Credits:3 cr

3 cr
  
  •  

    CJ 317 - Forensic Investigation


    This course is designed to provide the student with a broad introduction to the methods and techniques utilized by today’s forensic professionals. Students will explore the application of the physical, medical, natural and engineering sciences to specialized legal contexts, investigation of a crime scene, the role of law enforcement crime labs, and other important issues relating to forensic investigations.

    Credits:3 cr

3 cr
  
  •  

    CJ 320 - Restorative Justice


    Overview of community-centered alternatives to the formal legal system; philosophy and methods of non-coercive interaction among victims, offenders, and the community; focus on mediation, conflict resolution, family group conferencing, victim/offender reconciliation, and other restorative justice practices.

    Credits:3 cr

3 cr
  
  •  

    CJ 325 - Crime Mapping & Analysis


    This interdisciplinary course introduces students to Geographic Information Systems (GIS) applied to Criminal Justice theory and practices. Emphasis is placed on mapping crime data to determine spatial patterns, trends and hot spots through the scope of criminal justice theory for the end goal of informing police decisions. Students will develop skills in using ArcGIS extensions, managing spatial data, understanding statistical results, and applying existing criminal justice best practices to solve spatio-temporal problems.

    XLIST: GEOG 325  

    Credits:3 cr

3 cr
  
  •  

    CJ 326 - Research Methods


    Interaction of theory, research, and practice in criminal justice; purposes and limits of research; research design and data collection; analytical and data processing resources; preparation of research reports.

    Credits:3 cr

3 cr
  
  •  

    CJ 327 - Criminal Justice Evidence and Evaluations


    This course equips students to understand and be informed consumers of evidence and evaluations in order to build their capacity as evidence-informed decision-makers. Focus is on the challenges, limitations, and benefits of evaluation for CJ programs and strategies.

    Requisites: CJ 201!  (Required, Previous).

    Credits:3 cr

3 cr
  
  •  

    CJ 330 - American Constitutional Law: Rights & Liberties


    The history and development of the United States’ constitutional law. Emphasis upon the development of basic principles and doctrines established by the United States Supreme Court as they pertain to Civil Rights and Civil Liberties. Includes in-depth analysis of selected Supreme Court decisions.

    XLIST: PS 330  

    Credits:3 cr

3 cr
  
  •  

    CJ 340 - Crime and Punishment


    The interaction of criminal acts and criminal penalties, emphasizing the history, theoretical purposes, and problems associated with various custodial, noncustodial and physical punishments.

    Credits:3 cr

3 cr
  
  •  

    CJ 341 - Community Corrections


    The history, function and operation of community-based alternatives in corrections, including probation, parole and reintegration, work release and community residential facilities, diversion and intermediate sanctions; emphasis on contemporary applications and issues.

    Credits:3 cr

3 cr
  
  •  

    CJ 350 - Juvenile Justice System


    The system’s response to the juvenile crime problem in America; processing of juvenile offenders through police, judicial and correctional organizations; emphasis on rehabilitation approaches and distinctions between the juvenile and adult systems.

    Credits:3 cr

3 cr
  
  •  

    CJ 360 - Evidence & Criminal Procedure


    A review of procedural and evidentiary rules and cases relating to the admissibility of criminal evidence. Search warrants, probable cause, investigative stops, identification procedures (e.g. line-ups), interrogation requirements and the intricacies of hearsay are examples of focal topics.

    Requisites: CJ 305 and CJ 201! (Required, Previous).

    Credits:3 cr

3 cr
  
  •  

    CJ 370 - Federal and State Courts


    A study of the structure and process of federal and state courts.

    Credits:3 cr

3 cr
  
  •  

    CJ 375 - Criminal Justice on The Screen


     

    This course will examine the topic of media depictions of various branches of the criminal justice system from an interdisciplinary perspective. By drawing from criminological, sociological, and cultural studies perspectives, students will critically explore the various depictions of criminal justice in film, television, and internet outlets such as social media.

    Credits:3 cr

3 cr
  
  •  

    CJ 376 - Crime & Video Games


    A hands-on analysis of the complex relationships between video games and real-world crime and violence with emphasis on investigating, theorizing, and challenging current gaming practices and imagining new uses for games in the field of Criminal Justice.

    Credits:3 cr

3 cr
  
  •  

    CJ 381 - Social Justice


    Relationships between the components of criminal justice - police, courts and corrections - and individuals and groups in society; emphasis on issues related to diversity and difference in the interaction between public officials and members of various social groups - racial and ethnic minorities, social classes and special interest groups. The course explores numerous issues that are relevant to a framework of inclusion that often interfere with the achievement of social justice. Emphasis on introduction of concepts of inequality and its effects on diverse people by examining various social identities and the construction of difference.

    Credits:3 cr

3 cr
  
  •  

    CJ 382 - Conflict Resolution in Criminal Justice


    Special emphasis placed on diffusing and de-escalating conflict as it occurs in various criminal justice contexts. Equipping students to understand their personal barriers to intergroup communication between and among diverse populations will be covered.

    Requisites: CJ 201!  (Required, Previous).

    Credits:3 cr

3 cr
  
  •  

    CJ 383 - Global Perspectives in Criminal Justice


    A cross-national analysis and evaluation of selected criminal justice and legal systems and exploration of international and transnational crime, with emphasis upon the effects of diverse political ideologies on theory and practice.

    Credits:3 cr

3 cr
  
  •  

    CJ 390 - Special Topics


    A departmental course in a subject area not currently listed in the catalog. A descriptive title will appear on the Course Schedule and the transcript.

    Requisites: As listed in the course schedule (Required, Previous).

    Credits:1-4 cr

1-4 cr
  
  •  

    CJ 401 - Criminal Justice Issues and Policies


    Research into the issues facing the criminal justice system, the policies designed to address those issues, and the efficacy of those policies.

    Requisites: CJ 201! (Required, Previous).

    Credits:3 cr

3 cr
  
  •  

    CJ 406 - Serial Killers


    An examination of serial and mass murder from an interdisciplinary perspective focusing on criminological, sociological and psychological theories to explain these types of crimes.

    Credits:3 cr

3 cr
  
  •  

    CJ 410 - Criminology


    An investigation of the complex phenomena of crime and deviance in the United States, which emphasizes attempts at the scientific study of cultural, social and behavioral factors.

    Requisites: SOC 111   (Required, Previous).

    XLIST: SOC 410  

    Credits:3 cr

3 cr
  
  •  

    CJ 415 - White Collar Crime


    A comprehensive study of business crime, including the origin, history and basic conceptual methods of combating white collar crime. The topics for analysis include corporate fraud, industrial espionage and criminal enterprises.

    Credits:3 cr

3 cr
  
  •  

    CJ 420 - Criminal Justice Management


    Overview of management processes within criminal justice organizations - police, criminal courts, and corrections.

    Credits:3 cr

3 cr
  
  •  

    CJ 425 - Global Organized Crime


    This course provides an in-depth study of organized crime, criminal elements, and criminal behaviors in today’s global society. The class will study both historical and contemporary criminal organizations, the organizational structure and practices of these groups, and how the worldwide criminal justice system combats these threats.

    Credits:3 cr

3 cr
  
  •  

    CJ 430 - Wrongful Convictions


    The purpose of the course is to be able to systematically describe, explain, and analyze causes and consequences of wrongful convictions, as well as look into proposed solutions for the wrongfully convicted. This course will critically explore the phenomenon of wrongful convictions with a specific focus on some of the common causes, including: Eyewitness misidentification, false confessions, racial bias, faulty DNA evidence, tunnel vision, problematic interrogation techniques, prosecutorial misconduct, and inadequate defense work.

    Credits:3 cr

3 cr
  
  •  

    CJ 445 - Cyber Crime


    A comprehensive study of the theories, motivations, practices and apprehension of cyber criminals and deviants. The topics for analysis include the rationale for these acts, the identification of threats and activities, as well as preventative and prosecution methods.

    Requisites: None

    XLIST: None

    Credits:3 cr

    Notes: None
3 cr
  
  •  

    CJ 490 - Special Topics in Criminal Justice


    In-depth study of selected topics of current importance in one or more components of criminal justice; with change of topics, can be repeated for credit.

    Credits:1-4 cr

1-4 cr
  
  •  

    CJ 491 - Senior Seminar in Criminal Justice


    Intensive, small-group focus on specific issues related to a component of criminal justice - policing, private security, law and courts, corrections, or criminology. Highly participative and research-directed.

    Requisites: CJ 201! and an additional 18 credits of CJ courses or instructor permission (Required, Previous).

    Credits:3 cr

3 cr
  
  •  

    CJ 492 - Engaged Learning in Criminal Justice


    In this course students will prepare for success along their professional path through a structured process that integrates their university experience with community/professional experiences. Students must meet with the instructor of record or designee in the semester prior to the semester in which the student wishes to enroll to secure the student’s placement in an appropriate and mutually agreeable entity. This course will require the student to travel to and participate in this community-based, host entity on a routine basis. May enroll in this course twice.
     

    Requisites: CJ 201!  and instructor permission. (Required, Previous).

    Credits:3 cr

3 cr
  
  •  

    CJ 493 - Directed Reading in Criminal Justice


    Selection and completion of specific research project in criminal justice.

    Requisites: Instructor Permission (Required, Previous).

    Credits:1-4 cr

1-4 cr
  
  •  

    CJ 494 - Directed Research in Criminal Justice


    Selection and completion of specific research project in criminal justice.

    Requisites: Instructor permission (Required, Previous).

    Credits:1-4 cr

1-4 cr
  
  •  

    CJ 496 - Field Work


    Students will be assigned, after mutual agreement and definition of tasks, to a department or agency involved in or related to criminal justice. Supervised experience and work with clients as appropriate. Note: Student must contact professor upon registration (preferably the term before registration). May enroll in this course twice.

    Credits:3 cr

3 cr
  
  •  

    CJ 497 - Police Academy Training


    To obtain SVSU academic credits students must successfully meet the academy standards.

    Requisites: Instructor permission (Required, Previous).

    Credits:12 cr

12 cr
  
  •  

    CJ 498 - Special Topics


    Preparation and completion of an Honors Thesis. May enroll twice, once for the preparation of the proposal and once for its completion.

    Requisites: Honors student status and thesis advisor permission (Required, Previous).

    Credits:1-4 cr

1-4 cr

Economics

  
  •  

    ECON 125 - Introduction to Economics (GE6)


    An introduction to basic concepts and methods of economics. These concepts and methods are illustrated by application to the contemporary economy of the United States.

    Credits:3 cr

    General Education:   

3 cr
  
  •  

    ECON 175 - Decision Making in the Agricultural-Food


    Students will be introduced to the basic components and terminology associated with the agricultural systems used to produce and deliver food to people around the globe. Advances in scientific research and technology have lead to dramatic improvements in our ability to produce food and feed; however, perceived risks associated with many of these advancements now threaten food and environmental safety. In order to serve as future leaders and change agents in agriculture, as well as to act as informed citizens, students must gain an awareness of and appreciation for the diverse array of perspectives surrounding current issues in crop and food production. Students will explore the scientific and ethical bases of issues associated with agricultural and food systems. Activities are designed to support students with engaging in productive discussions about different perspectives of issues related to crop and food production.

    Credits:3 cr

3 cr
  
  •  

    ECON 190 - Special Topics


    A departmental course in a subject area not currently listed in the catalog. A descriptive title will appear on the course schedule and the transcript.

    Requisites: As listed in the course schedule. (Required, Previous).

    Credits:1-4 cr

1-4 cr
  
  •  

    ECON 221 - Principles of Macroeconomics (GE7)


    An introduction to macroeconomics, with emphasis on the institutions that affect our well-being. The major economic tools” are introduced, including the laws of supply and demand, mainstream macroeconomic theories, and models of international trade and development. Issues of national income determination, employment, inflation, and monetary and fiscal policies, receive significant attention. Ethical considerations of established and alternative social institutions are weighed.

    Credits:4 cr

    General Education:  

4 cr
  
  •  

    ECON 222 - Principles of Microeconomics


    This course focuses on the decision-making processes at the individual- and firm-level. Areas covered will include the economics of the firm and resource allocation, current domestic economic problems, international economics, the underdeveloped countries and the challenge of alternative economic systems.

    Credits:4 cr

4 cr
  
  •  

    ECON 235 - Introductory Statistics (GE3)


    Collection, analysis and statistical interpretation of data which include description of data, elementary probability theory, sampling, statistical estimation and inference

    Requisites: MATH 103 or satisfactory score on pretest. (Required, Previous).

    Credits:4 cr

    General Education:  

4 cr
  
  •  

    ECON 290 - Special Topics


    A departmental course in a subject area not currently listed in the catalog. A descriptive title will appear on the Course Schedule and the transcript.

    Requisites: As listed in the course schedule. (Required, Previous).

    Credits:1-4 cr

1-4 cr
  
  •  

    ECON 303 - Environmental Economics


    This course will be concerned with the application of the tools of economic analysis from the areas of value theory and employment theory to particular environmental problems, such as air and water pollution and recycling.

    Requisites: ECON 222, junior standing. (Required, Previous).

    Credits:2-3 cr

2-3 cr
  
  •  

    ECON 313 - Money and Financial Institutions


    An exploratory course into the role of money, banking, and financial institutions. Topics such as monetary policy, banks and other financial intermediaries, and significant developments in monetary/banking policy are covered. Students are provided with the tools necessary to evaluate monetary policy and the role of banks in the financial markets from both the theoretical and practical aspects.

    Requisites: ECON 222  , junior standing. (Required, Previous).

    XLIST: FIN 313  

    Credits:4 cr

4 cr
  
  •  

    ECON 321 - Intermediate Macroeconomics


    An examination of the forces that determine the general level of prices, employment and output.

    Requisites: ECON 222, junior standing. (Required, Previous).

    Credits:4 cr

4 cr
  
  •  

    ECON 322 - Intermediate Microeconomics


    A study of the role of price in organizing economic activity.

    Requisites: ECON 222, junior standing (Required, Previous).

    Credits:4 cr

4 cr
  
  •  

    ECON 324 - Economics of Labor


    Development of labor organizations from the early association of workers to the present. Analysis of the problems of control over wages, hours and working conditions and the means to obtain and exercise this control by labor organizations.

    Requisites: ECON 222, junior standing. (Required, Previous).

    Credits:2-4 cr

2-4 cr
  
  •  

    ECON 325 - Economics of Competitive Sports


    Introduction to the economics of sports. Topics: demand for sports, public finance of facilities, labor relations laws governing league structure, sports agents, salaries, broadcasting revenues, league histories. Professional (MLB, NHL, NBA, WNBA, NFL) minor league, and the NCAA will be covered. A specific case study will address the business of the Saginaw Spirit.

    Requisites: ECON 222. (Required, Previous).

    Credits:4 cr

4 cr
  
  •  

    ECON 335 - Applied Statistics


    Application of statistical techniques to forecasting and other business and economics problems. Topics covered are regression, correlation, analysis of variance, time series and index numbers, some nonparametric techniques and Bayes’ Theorem.

    Requisites: ECON 235. (Required, Previous).

    Credits:2 cr

2 cr
  
  •  

    ECON 342 - Global Experience in Economics


    The primary goal of this course is to familiarize students with economics in an international setting and provide them international educational experiences while taking them abroad to develop their knowledge, awareness, and attitudes to help them succeed our the global society.

    Requisites: Junior Standing or instructor permission

    Credits:3 cr

    Notes: Special course fees apply.
3 cr
  
  •  

    ECON 353 - The History of Economic Ideas


    This course searches for the origin of many of our current economic policies in the writings of original contributors to economic theory. The original works of Adam Smith, Karl Marx and many others are stressed.

    Requisites: Junior standing. (Required, Previous).

    Credits:4 cr

4 cr
  
  •  

    ECON 356 - Economics for Entrepreneurs


    Understanding and application of economic concepts for a successful entrepreneurship. Examples of topics are: an overview of macroeconomic environment for business, supply, demand, analysis of cost and production and profit, efficient resource allocation, international aspects, government regulations, labor market conditions, market structure and competition, fiscal and monetary policies affecting entrepreneurs, decision making under uncertainty, and forecasting for business success and planning.

    Requisites: Junior standing. (Required, Previous).

    Credits:3 cr

3 cr
  
  •  

    ECON 363 - Business & Economic Forecasting


    Theories and analysis of fluctuation in economic activity. Forecasting techniques and formulation of short-term and long-term models for business and government.

    Requisites: ECON 222, ECON 335, junior standing. (Required, Previous).

    Credits:4 cr

4 cr
  
  •  

    ECON 375 - Managerial Economics


    The role and function of business firms in the economy and the application of economic theory to managerial decisions, including theoretical models, practical business cases and implications for public policy.

    Requisites: ECON 222, ECON 335, junior standing. (Required, Previous).

    Credits:4 cr

4 cr
  
  •  

    ECON 390 - Current Economic Problems


    An examination of the contributions that economic analysis can make to the solution of a diverse set of problems currently facing the society. While the specific topics covered will vary, some typical examples might include the energy crisis, exploitation and discrimination, income distribution, unemployment, inflation, poverty and the negative income tax.

    Requisites: Junior standing. (Required, Previous).

    Credits:2-4 cr

2-4 cr
  
  •  

    ECON 402 - Public Finance


    A theoretical and institutional approach to government finance organized around the allocation, distribution, stabilization and growth functions.

    Requisites: ECON 222, junior standing. (Required, Previous).

    Credits:4 cr

4 cr
  
  •  

    ECON 424 - Industrial Organization


    This course examines the determinants and outcomes of industry structure and firm behavior in competitive and noncompetitive environments. Topics include pricing, product differentiation, mergers, antitrust regulation, advertising, research and development and game theory applications. Emphasis is placed on theoretical models and empirical studies.

    Requisites: ECON 222, junior standing. (Required, Previous).

    Credits:4 cr

4 cr
  
  •  

    ECON 441 - International Economics


    A general course in the field of international economic relations with emphasis on the fundamentals of international trade theory.

    Requisites: ECON 222, junior standing. (Required, Previous).

    Credits:3 cr

3 cr
  
  •  

    ECON 461 - Introduction to Econometrics


    The formulation of models of economic behavior and methods of estimating and testing these models. Some of the topics included are: time series, cross section and factor analysis data, demand analysis and macroeconomic models.

    Requisites: Junior standing, and MKT 236 or ECON 335. (Required, Previous).

    Credits:3 cr

3 cr
  
  •  

    ECON 465 - Economic Development


    A study of economic development problems and programs including a review of economic planning techniques.

    Requisites: ECON 222 and junior standing or instructor permission. (Required, Previous).

    Credits:4 cr

4 cr
  
  •  

    ECON 475 - Research Methodology


    This course provides an introduction to research methods and designs and is available to all undergraduate students. This comprehensive introductory course includes writing a research proposal, developing research questions, identifying databases or developing appropriate instruments to develop datasets, conducting a literature review, selecting appropriate empirical models, and writing a report after analysis. The primary objective of this course is to learn about applied research and construct a hands on project. The first half of this course will focus more on the theoretical side while the last half of this course will offer the application side through in depth training using a statistical software package. Upon successful completion students will become novice researchers. An additional goal for the course is to prepare students for graduate studies and to aid in their admission to quality graduate programs by giving them the skills and experience needed to succeed at this level. Students also gain a visible research record by presenting and/or publishing their research which should increase the chances of being accepted into these graduate programs.

    Requisites: MATH 120B and ECON 335, or equivalent statistics courses, or instructor permission (Required, Previous)

    Credits:4 cr

4 cr
  
  •  

    ECON 490 - Special Topics in Economics


    A departmental course in a subject area not currently listed in the catalog. A descriptive title will appear on the Course Schedule and the transcript.

    Requisites: As listed in the course schedule. (Required, Previous).

    Credits:1-4 cr

1-4 cr
  
  •  

    ECON 491 - Special Seminar


    A departmental seminar in a subject area not currently listed in the catalog. A descriptive title will appear on the Course Schedule and the transcript.

    Requisites: As listed in the course schedule. (Required, Previous).

    Credits:1-4 cr

1-4 cr
  
  •  

    ECON 493 - Directed Reading in Economics


    Student must submit a plan of study for approval before enrolling.

    Requisites: Junior standing or instructor permission. (Required, Previous).

    Credits:1-4 cr

1-4 cr
  
  •  

    ECON 497 - Senior Thesis


    Student must submit a plan of study for approval, before enrolling.

    Requisites: Junior standing, instructor permission. (Required, Previous).

    Credits:1-4 cr

1-4 cr
  
  •  

    ECON 498 - Honors Thesis


    Preparation and completion of an Honors Thesis. May enroll twice, once for the preparation of the proposal and once for its completion.

    Requisites: Honors student status, thesis advisor permission. (Required, Previous).

    Credits:3 cr

3 cr

Educational Leadership

  
  •  

    EDL 305 - Computer Applications Sec/Middle Schools


    Introduces students to teaching methods that work well when combined with the microcomputer and associated applications software. Students may work on the Internet, participate in video conferences and learn to employ several digital communications tools.

    Requisites: Acceptance to the Teacher Education Program. Recommended: TEMS 302 concurrently. (Required, Previous).

    Credits:3 cr

3 cr
  
  •  

    EDL 494 - Independent Research


    An independent research project in the discipline by a student or a cooperative research project with a faculty member. The student and instructor must agree on a project before enrollment.

    Requisites: Instructor permission, 3.00 GPA or higher and a minimum of 12 credits in the discipline. (Required, Previous).

    Credits:1-4 cr

1-4 cr

Electrical Engineering

  
  •  

    ECE 101 - Engineering Careers & Concepts


    Introduction to engineering careers, including the ethical, social, professional and economic environment in which engineering is practiced today. Students also will be introduced to fundamental concepts and modern methods for solving engineering problems through a semester-long design project. (2-0)

    Requisites: All math Basic Skills or course placement tests. (Required, Previous).

    XLIST: ME 101  

    Credits:2 cr

2 cr
  
  •  

    ECE 190 - Special Topics


    A departmental course in a subject area not currently listed in the catalog. A descriptive title will appear on the course schedule and the transcript.

    Requisites: All listed in the course schedule (Required, Previous).

    Credits:1-4 cr

1-4 cr
  
  •  

    ECE 216 - Digital Circuits


    Binary number system; Boolean algebra, Karnaugh maps, basic logic gates, combinational circuits and designs, sequential circuit design using flip-flops, counters and shift registers, digital arithmetic, memory devices and basic structures of a microprocessor. (3-0)

    Requisites: MATH 120 or higher

    Credits:3 cr

3 cr
  
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    ECE 216L - Digital Circuits Laboratory


    Laboratory experiments to follow the ECE 216 course material requiring design and implementation of logic functions; design and implementation of sequential circuits using counters, shift registers and digital arithmetic elements. (0-3)

    Requisites: ECE 216 or instructor permission (Required, Previous or concurrent).

    Credits:1 cr

1 cr
  
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    ECE 235 - Circuits I


    Techniques of circuit analysis, network theorems, sinusoidal analysis, the phasor concept, alternating current steady state analysis, average and RMS values and power. (3-0)

    Requisites: MATH 161   (Required, Previous). | ECE 235L   (Required, Concurrent).

    Credits:3 cr

3 cr
  
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    ECE 235L - Circuits I Laboratory


    DC transient circuits, concepts of impedance and admittance, RLC circuit analysis, polyphase circuits, network analysis, resonance and frequency response. (0-3)

    Requisites: ECE 235 concurrent. (Required, Concurrent).

    Credits:1 cr

1 cr
  
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    ECE 255 - Electrical Engineering Computer Methods


    General methods of problem solving, modeling, and simulation using specialized electrical engineering software such as MATLAB/Simulink, LabVIEW, and Multisim. Applications will be drawn from digital and analog electrical systems. Course includes a computational laboratory to implement topics covered in lectures.

    Requisites: ECE 235 (Required, Concurrent).

    Credits:3 cr

3 cr
  
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    ECE 290 - Special Topics


    A departmental course in a subject area not currently listed in the catalog. A descriptive title will appear on the course schedule and the transcript.

    Requisites: As listed in the course schedule (Required, Previous).

    Credits:1-4 cr

1-4 cr
  
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    ECE 302 - Electrical Engineering Analysis


    Applications of advanced mathematical techniques in electrical engineering. Topics include probability, statistics, functions of complex variables, discrete mathematics, continuous and discrete Fourier transforms, and optimization techniques.

    Requisites: MATH 262 (Required, Previous).

    Credits:3 cr

3 cr
  
  •  

    ECE 318 - Electronic Circuits I


    Diode circuits and applications, operation and characteristics of transistors, small signal analysis and design, multi-stage amplifier design, frequency response and differential amplifiers.

    Requisites: ECE 235, MATH 161. (Required, Previous). | ECE 318L (Required, Concurrent).

    Credits:3 cr

3 cr
  
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    ECE 318L - Electronic Circuits I Laboratory


    Diode characteristics and applications, design of BJT and FET biasing circuits and small signal amplifiers; measurement of gain and I/O resistances. (0-3)

    Requisites: Take MATH*161; Minimum grade C,TR. (Required, Previous). | ECE 318 (Required, Concurrent).

    Credits:1 cr

1 cr
  
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    ECE 335 - Circuits II


    Polyphase circuits, resonance and frequency response and complex frequency. Transient and forced response of RL, RC and RLC circuits, application of unit step forcing function. Fourier analysis, Fourier transform, Laplace transform techniques. (3-0)

    Requisites: ECE 235, MATH 162, or instructor permission (Required, Previous).

    Credits:3 cr

3 cr
  
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    ECE 341 - Intro to Power Electronics & Drives


    Analytical and circuit models of the basic components of electric machine control systems: electromagnetic and electromechanical principles; transformers and rotating AC and DC machines; power electronics and power converters; DC motor drives. Steady state computer simulation of power converters and drive systems is an integral component of the course. (3-0)

    Requisites: ECE 318, MATH 161. (Required, Previous). | ECE 341L (Required, Concurrent).

    Credits:3 cr

3 cr
 

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